Binita, 17 years old,
works six month a year in a brick kiln since she is eight or nine years old

"Today I feel more sure of myself. I want to learn to sew so I can be a seamstress in my village and not have to rely on seasonal work."

Binita (name has been changed), 17, lives with her sick father and young brother in a hut at a brick kiln in Jhyauli in Nepal

“Since I am eight or nine years old, my family has come here to work for the six winter months. I had to stop going to school in grade four because I couldn’t catch up when I got back to the village.

Here, I make between 700 and 800 bricks a day and I get paid one rupee (1 centime) for each brick I mould. I want to help rebuild our house, which was destroyed in the earthquake.

I take part in the children’s club at the brick kiln. It was there that I learned that I have rights that must be respected.

I saw a doctor at the mobile clinic. The social worker also gave us information on sexual health and hygiene. Toilets have been built, which makes things much easier for me. We have had access to drinking water since filters were installed.

My brother, who is 13, can go to the informal education centre for four hours a day.

Today I feel more sure of myself. I want to learn to sew so I can be a seamstress in my village and not have to rely on seasonal work.”

Picture: © Terre des hommes / Joseph Donald